Have We Wasted Over a Decade?

Originally posted on Daniel Katz, Ph.D.:

A dominant narrative of the past decade and a half of education reform has been to highlight alleged persistent failures of our education system.  While this tale began long ago with the Reagan Administration report A Nation at Risk, it has been put into overdrive in the era of test based accountability that began with the No Child Left Behind Act.  That series of amendments to the Elementary and Secondary Education Act mandated annual standardized testing of all students in grades 3-8 and once in high school, set a target for 100% proficiency for all students in English and mathematics, and imposed consequences for schools and districts that either failed to reach proficiency targets or failed to test all students.  Under the Obama administration, the federal Department of Education has freed states from the most stringent requirements to meet those targets, but in return, states had to commit themselves…

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Yong Zhao’s NPE Speech, Transcribed– Part V (All Done)

Originally posted on deutsch29:

On Saturday, April 25, 2015, University of Oregon education professor Yong Zhao gave a keynote address at the second annual conference of the Network for Public Education (NPE). Zhao’s entire 55-minute speech can be found here.

I thought this speech worthy of preservation as a Word document; so, I decided to transcribe it.

I am pleased to say that I am finished. The full transcription of Zhao’s speech is available here for any and all who wish to read it:

Yong_Zhao NPE Transcript

However, the remainder of this post consists of the last of my five installments of Zhao’s speech, for those who have been patiently waiting for this, Part V, after having read Parts IIIIII, and IV.

At the conclusion of Part IV, I ended with Zhao’s discussion of Asian officials’ wondering how it is that their students score so well on…

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The Fischbowl: In The Real World

I think we also abrogate our personal responsibility when we use this phrase. If our practices in school are different than practices “in the real world” (outside of school), why is that? Is there a good reason for it, or not? When we choose to be more “lenient” in school (typical use #1), there’s hopefully a good reason for that practice. When we choose to operate in school in the same fashion as outside of school (typical use #2), there’s hopefully a good reason for that as well. And we conveniently seem to forget who has created the “non-real” world of school: we have. So if the world “in school” is different, either in a positive or negative way, we need to own that.

via The Fischbowl: In The Real World.

How to Ensure that Making Leads to Learning | School Library Journal

There’s no doubt that students find making to be a creative and engaging activity. But as they tinker, design, and invent, are they actually learning anything?

Making is too young a phenomenon to have generated a broad research base to answer this question. The literature that does exist comes from enthusiastic champions of making, rather than disinterested investigators. But there are two well-established lines of research within psychology and cognitive science that can inform how we understand making and help us ensure that making leads to learning. Taken together, these two strands of empirical evidence provide the best guide we presently have for maximizing the learning potential of maker activities.

via How to Ensure that Making Leads to Learning | School Library Journal.

[New post] Yong Zhao’s NPE Speech, Transcribed– Part IV – bplants@gmail.com – Gmail

Look at every individual student. Every individual student is unique, unique in many different ways. They’re unique in terms of their cognitive or general abilities. We now accept the idea about multiple intelligences. We accept that.  People are talented in different domains. That’s why I never go [to] try to get a football scholarship for myself. I won’t even try. [laughter] I know what I’m good at, you know? People are differently talented. Talented means they have different possibility or aptitude [to] acquire different things.

via [New post] Yong Zhao’s NPE Speech, Transcribed– Part IV – bplants@gmail.com – Gmail.

The Dunning-Kruger Effect: A Malady of Reform

Originally posted on Diane Ravitch's blog:

Thanks to a reader for introducing me to the Dunning-Kruger effect.

Here is one definition:

“One of the painful things about our time is that those who feel certainty are stupid, and those with any imagination and understanding are filled with doubt and indecision.”

—Bertrand Russell, The Triumph of Stupidity

We see all about us people who are certain they know how to “reform” education, even though they never taught, never engaged in deep study, and know very little about teaching and learning. The less they know, the more certain they are.

On the other hand, those who have experience are likely to say, “It depends.” Or “do no harm.” Or, try it out on a small scale first.” Or, “how do you know? What’s the evidence?”

Unfortunately, many governors and legislators are certain they know how to “fix” education, and they impose their wrong-headed solutions in people who work…

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Yong Zhao’s NPE Speech, Transcribed–Part III

Originally posted on deutsch29:

On Saturday, April 25, 2015, University of Oregon education professor Yong Zhao gave a keynote address at the second annual conference of the Network for Public Education (NPE). Zhao’s entire 55-minute speech can be found here.

This insightful and incredibly humorous speech should not be missed.

I was so impressed with Zhao’s words that I decided to transcribe his entire keynote in five segments of approximately 11 minutes each, or roughly 2,000 words per installment.

On May 2, 2015, I posted Part I, a hilarious segment in which Zhao speaks of “out-of-basement readiness” and the “race to the big” as the cause of extinction for the native people on Easter Island.

On May 4, 2015, I continued with Part II and the deep question, “Why is America still here?” along with America’s ueber-love for China’s international test scores– which China does not celebrate, and ending with the question…

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Yong Zhao’s NPE Speech, Transcribed– Part II

Originally posted on deutsch29:

On Saturday, April 25, 2015, University of Oregon education professor Yong Zhao gave a keynote address at the second annual conference of the Network for Public Education (NPE). Zhao’s entire 55-minute speech can be found here.

This insightful and incredibly humorous speech should not be missed.

I was so impressed with Zhao’s words that I decided to transcribe his entire keynote in five segments of approximately 11 minutes each, or roughly 2,000 words per installment.

On May 2, 2015, I posted Part I, a hilarious segment in which Zhao speaks of “out-of-basement readiness” and the “race to the big” as the cause of extinction for the native people on Easter Island.

Below is my second transcribed segment. I overlap the text a bit with the previous post to preserve context.

Enjoy!

…You may be ready for college, but college is not guarantee for “out of basement” readiness. You…

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Yong Zhao’s NPE Speech, Transcribed– Part I

Originally posted on deutsch29:

On Saturday, April 25, 2015, University of Oregon education professor Yong Zhao gave a keynote address at the second annual conference of the Network for Public Education (NPE). Zhao’s entire 55-minute speech can be found here.

It is a fantastic speech– truthful, yet also incredibly funny, and encouraging.

I was so impressed with Zhao’s words that I decided to transcribe his entire keynote. I believe his sppech is valuable enough to be preserved as a text. I also realize that many may not be able to srt aside 55 minutes to watch a video might be more inclined to read his words in more manageable installments.

I will post the speech in a series of five parts, each approximately 11 minutes long and consisting of under 2,000 words. In my last post, I will include a link to Zhao’s transcribed keynote in its entirety.

And now, for Part I:

View original 1,957 more words

Watch John Oliver Explain How Standardized Testing Has Gotten Out Of Control | Blog | Media Matters for America

Last Week Tonight host John Oliver highlighted the standardized testing environment in many of today’s schools, discussing the high stakes and stress often associated with testing in classrooms across the United States.

In contrast to recent calls for annual testing from some media outlets, Oliver spent nearly 18 minutes covering the current realities of standardized testing on the May 3 edition of HBO’s Last Week Tonight, including high-stakes testing and value-added models that can negatively impact teachers and students. He also emphasized the connection to “publishing giant” Pearson, a company whom a Politico investigation found that “public officials often commit to buying from…

via Watch John Oliver Explain How Standardized Testing Has Gotten Out Of Control | Blog | Media Matters for America.

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