British Pathé Makes 85,000 Historical Clips Available On YouTube | Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

British Pathé was one of the leading producers of newsreels and documentaries during the 20th Century. This week, the company, now an archive, is turning over its entire collection — over 85,000 historical films – to YouTube.The archive — which spans from 1896 to 1976 – is a goldmine of footage, containing movies of some of the most important moments of the last 100 years.It’s an amazing collection that will be gold mine to U.S. and World History teachers everywhere. And, in a bonus to teachers of English Language Learners, many appear to be close-captioned not using YouTube’s error-plagued automatic system.

via British Pathé Makes 85,000 Historical Clips Available On YouTube | Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day….

OECD educationtoday

The world is rapidly becoming a different place, with globalisation and modernisation imposing huge challenges to individuals and societies. Schools need to prepare students to live and work in a world in which most people will need to collaborate with people of diverse cultural origins, and appreciate different ideas, perspectives and values; a world in which people need to decide how to trust and collaborate across such differences, often bridging space and time through technology; and a world in which their lives will be affected by issues that transcend national boundaries. Twenty-first century schools help students to develop autonomy and identity that is cognisant of the reality of national and global pluralism, equipping them to join others in life, work and citizenship.

via OECD educationtoday.

How Minecraft Teaches Reading, Writing and Problem Solving | Ask a Tech Teacher

Most simulation games–where players role-play life in a pretend world–aren’t so much Make Your Own Adventure as See If You Survive Ours. Players are a passenger in a hero’s journey, solving riddles, advancing through levels and unlocking prizes. That’s not Minecraft. Here, they create the world. Nothing happens without their decision–not surroundings or characters or buildings rising or holes being dug. There isn’t a right or wrong answer. There’s merely what You decide and where those decisions land You. Players have one goal: To survive. Prevail. They solve problems or cease to exist. If the teacher wants to use games to learn history, Minecraft won’t throw students into a fully fleshed simulation of the American Revolution. It’ll start with a plot of land and students will write the story, cast the characters, create the entire 1776 world. Again, think Legos.

via How Minecraft Teaches Reading, Writing and Problem Solving | Ask a Tech Teacher.

iLearn Technology » Blog Archive » Sphero: the coolest robot around

This week, the wonderful people at Orbotix sent me a Sphero to try out and play with. HOLY COW, I haven’t had so much fun with a new toy in a long time. The better part of today was spent learning about the Sphero and stealthily “driving” it into classrooms much to the delight of kids. Sphero is a robotic ball that gets controlled by iPhone, iPad, or android device. I had it rolling all over school this morning…I only wish I had thought ahead to record student reactions I was using my iPhone to control it and didn’t think about video and pictures. I had so much fun with it, that I brought it home to play and learn some more. It is equally loved by my dogs! Sphero seems like a simple concept, a ball that can be controlled via tablet or phone. Even though the concept is simple, I have to admit, I’m pretty floored by the way that this little ball moves around effortlessly as if by magic. We have a hallway in our school that includes an incline and it rolled up it without any trouble, like a champ! It is SO much more than a fun rolley ball. There are a slew of apps that interact with the Sphero making it ultra fun and educational. The majority of apps available are totally free to download. There are a few that cost $0.99. Apps include:

via iLearn Technology » Blog Archive » Sphero: the coolest robot around.

Project to Improve Poor Children’s Intellect Led to Better Health, Data Show – NYTimes.com

In 1972, researchers in North Carolina started following two groups of babies from poor families. In the first group, the children were given full-time day care up to age 5 that included most of their daily meals, talking, games and other stimulating activities. The other group, aside from baby formula, got nothing. The scientists were testing whether the special treatment would lead to better cognitive abilities in the long run.Forty-two years later, the researchers found something that they had not expected to see: The group that got care was far healthier, with sharply lower rates of high blood pressure and obesity, and higher levels of so-called good cholesterol.

via Project to Improve Poor Children’s Intellect Led to Better Health, Data Show – NYTimes.com.

The Ongoing Debate on Public and Private School Effectiveness: Vouchers, Representative Samples, Fundamentalism and Wal-Mart – @ THE CHALK FACE

To no one’s surprise, the market-oriented EducationNext, “a journal of opinion and research,” does not like the findings outlined in the recent book, The Public School Advantage: Why Public Schools Outperform Private Schools, which I wrote with Prof. Sarah Theule Lubienski. After all, the two large, nationally representative datasets we analyzed do not lend support to that publication’s agenda of school privatization. While I wouldn’t normally respond to reviews, the misconceptions and errors advanced by EdNext and subsequent blog postings deserve some scrutiny. In particular, as I show below, bloggers at the University of Arkansas and the conservative National Review Online have used the EdNext review as an opportunity to make claims that are simply wrong.

via The Ongoing Debate on Public and Private School Effectiveness: Vouchers, Representative Samples, Fundamentalism and Wal-Mart – @ THE CHALK FACE.

Can Schools Be Held Accountable Without Standardized Tests? | MindShift

While many agree that schools should be accountable for student learning, reducing the measurement down to one score, once a year doesn’t help, Morgan said. The school ends up learning that, on the whole, it got better at reading, but nothing about individual skills like fluency of reading, higher order thinking skills, or the ability to tell the difference between fiction and non-fiction. To get that kind of granular feedback, Douglas County has turned to performance-based assessments.

Douglas County started developing its own performance assessments in 2011 to try and measure the kind of thinking and doing students would need for the real world. Teachers now require students to demonstrate knowledge and skills they’ve learned so that they can pinpoint the specific elements of a nuanced learning goal and be able to tell how a student is doing.

via Can Schools Be Held Accountable Without Standardized Tests? | MindShift.

Five Things I Want Teachers To Know About Edtech | EdSurge News

Over the course of my time as a student, I have been lucky enough to see technology evolve from dial-up Internet and floppy disks, to high speed wireless and pocket-sized mobile computers. Now, as a high school student, I couldn’t imagine not being able to access any resource I want from my smartphone. Educational technology is changing faster than ever, and I am so excited to see its continued growth. However, I realize that if my teachers don’t have the right knowledge about educational technology programs those programs can be misused or not be used at all.So, I spend my time helping teachers. In my freshman year of high school, I developed a program for staff members that was designed to support and encourage the use of technology in their classroom. I taught teachers how to use their computers – I even assigned quizzes to check for understanding!As a student who supports staff members with technology, I see that it is challenging at times. I want my teachers to use educational technology more effectively, but at the same time I see and understand the struggles they are going through. Many teachers are having difficulty trying to implement edtech when there are new initiatives to focus on such as the Common Core and new teacher evaluations. They feel they don’t have the time to invest in new technology skills.  However, the teachers who are eager to learn have asked me for some advice over the years about implementing edtech, and this is what I tell them:

via Five Things I Want Teachers To Know About Edtech | EdSurge News.

To Advance Education, We Must First Reimagine Society | MindShift

In general, schools should move away from “an overemphasis on teaching,” Abbott says, and instead view teachers as imaginative, knowledgeable guides. “Any kid can read a textbook — they don’t need a teacher standing over them telling them to do so,” he points out. “They need teachers to inspire them to think about things in a much bigger way than they’ve done before.”

via To Advance Education, We Must First Reimagine Society | MindShift.

What’s Your Learning Disposition? How to Foster Students’ Mindsets | MindShift

TIPS FOR TEACHING MINDSETS

Influencing how students view themselves as learners is challenging work. Students often won’t respond if a teacher just tells them how they should think — that creates defensiveness. Instead, a good tactic is to teach them some of the neuroscience around learning, including that the brain is malleable.“You’re telling students that when you work on really challenging things that’s when your brain is growing the most,” said Carissa Romero, assistant director of Stanford’s PERTS center, which studies academic motivation. Giving them a reason to care about their approach to learning helps them connect it to their own lives.

via What’s Your Learning Disposition? How to Foster Students’ Mindsets | MindShift.

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